Friday, March 28, 2014

Malaysia Airline Flight 370 Mystery continues Day 21 - March 28 , 2014 News of the Day ..... After a couple days of bad weather , the search resumes to track alleged debris sightings observed on satellites from Thailand , France and Japan ..... An overview of the technology at issue ...... Blame game trial balloon in the absence of hard facts , blame the pilot ? Credible leads or just flailing in the dark and searching for mere ocean trash / debris ? Is this proof that flight MH370 was downed by a 'blow torch' fire in its cockpit? British lawyers claim missing jet suffered same fate as another Boeing 777 three years ago ....... Morning items from The Guardian Live blog and doubts regarding debris being credible leads rather than just more confusion and misleading items.......


MH370 Lost in Indian Ocean: Hishammuddin's statement : Day 21

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KUALA LUMPUR: Following is the statement by Acting Transport Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein on the latest updates of MH370.

Introductory statement
Today, the search for MH370 has been further refined. The international investigation team continue working to narrow the search area, and shed further light on MH370’s flight path.
We are, as always, grateful for the continuing co-operation of our partners in this difficult and intensive search.
Whilst search operations are on-going, we continue to focus our efforts on caring for the families. In Cabinet this morning, we discussed the importance of continuing to support the relatives of the passengers and crew.

Refined search area
On Monday, the Prime Minister announced that based on new data analysis, Inmarsat and the AAIB had concluded that MH370 flew along the southern corridor, and that its last position was in the middle of the Indian Ocean, west of Perth.
On Tuesday, I confirmed that further study of this data would be undertaken to attempt to determine the final position of the aircraft. The Malaysian investigation team set up an international working group, comprising agencies with expertise in satellite communications and aircraft performance, to take this work forward.
The international working group included representatives from the UK, namely Inmarsat, AAIB, and Rolls Royce; from China, namely the CAAC and AAID; from the US, namely the NTSB, FAA, and Boeing; as well as the relevant Malaysian authorities.
The group has been working to refine the Inmarsat data, and to analyse it – together with other information, including radar data and aircraft performance assumptions – to narrow the search area.
Information which had already been examined by the investigation was re-examined in light of new evidence drawn from the Inmarsat data analysis.
In addition, international partners – who continue to process data in their home countries, as well as in the international working group – have further refined existing data. They have also come up with new technical information, for example on aircraft performance.
Yesterday, this process yielded new results, which indicated that MH370 flew at a higher speed than previously thought, which in turn means it used more fuel and could not travel as far. This information was passed to RCC Australia by the NTSB, to help further refine and narrow the search area.
The Australian authorities have indicated that they have shifted the search area approximately 1,100 kilometres to the north east. Because of ocean drift, this new search area could still be consistent with the potential objects identified by various satellite images over the past week.
This work is on-going, and we can expect further refinements. As the Australian authorities indicated this morning, this is standard practice in a search operation. It is a process of continually refining data which in turn further narrows the search area. With each step, we get closer to understanding MH370’s flight path.
Searches must be conducted on the best information available at the time. In the search for MH370, we have consistently followed the evidence, and acted on credible leads. Our search and rescue efforts have been directed by verified and corroborated information. This latest refinement of the search area is no different.

Satellite images
Last night, Japanese authorities announced they had satellite images which showed a number of floating objects approximately 2,500 kilometres southwest of Perth. Early this morning we received separate satellite imagery from the Thai authorities which also showed potential objects.
These new satellite images join those released by Australia, China, France, and Malaysia, all of which are with RCC Australia. The range of potential objects, and the difficulty in re-identifying them shows just how complex this investigation is. We remain grateful to all our partners for continuing to assist in the search operations.

Concluding remarks.
The new search area, approximately 1,680 kilometres west of Perth, remains in the Australian area of responsibility.
Australia continues to lead the search efforts in this new area, and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority gave a comprehensive operational update earlier today. As more information emerges, they will be issuing frequent operational updates, including on assets deployed.
I would like to echo their statements that the new search area, although more focused than before, remains considerable; and that the search conditions, although easier than before, remain challenging.
For the families of those on board, we pray that further processing of data, and further progress in the search itself, brings us closer to finding MH370.





MH370 Lost in Indian Ocean: Satellite clues could still be consistent


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KUALA LUMPUR: The moving of the location where investigators believe a missing Malaysian jetliner crashed into the Indian Ocean could still be consistent with potential debris spotted in satellite images, Malaysia's Acting Transport Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Huissein said.

Ships and aircraft scouring the remote waters off western Australia were re-directed on Friday to a new area 1,100 km (685 miles) north of where they have been searching for more than a week for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, which went missing on March 8 with 239 people on board.
Hishammuddin said new analysis of data on the plane's flight path indicated it had travelled faster, and therefore would have used more fuel, than had been previously thought.
"The Australian authorities have indicated that they have shifted the search area approximately 1,100 kilometres to the northeast," he told a news conference.
"Because of ocean drift, this new search area could still be consistent with the potential objects identified by various satellite images over the past week. This work is on-going, and we can expect further refinements."   --REUTERS


MH370 Lost in Indian Ocean: Planes chase satellite sightings

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PERTH, Australia: Planes and ships were to resume the hunt Friday for wreckage of flight MH370 after the weather cleared, as they chase down more satellite sightings of suspected debris nearly three weeks after the jet crashed.

Sorties being flown by planes from Australia, China, Japan and the United States were forced back to Perth on Thursday as thunderstorms and gale force winds swept through the southern Indian Ocean, although five ships stayed put.
There were fears that the weather would set in, but the Australian Maritime Safety Authority said the search would start again.
“The MH370 search will resume this morning,” it tweeted in the increasingly desperate quest to confirm that debris sighted by satellite came from the Malaysia Airlines jet that vanished on March 8 with 239 people on board.
The resumption follows Thailand reporting Thursday a satellite sighting of hundreds of floating objects. Japan also announced a satellite analysis indicated around 10 square floating objects in a similar area, the Kyodo news agency said.
They were the second sightings in two days suggesting a possible debris field from the Boeing 777.
As well as planes from six nations, five ships from China and Australia  have joined the search, battling fierce winds and sometimes mountainous seas as  they look for hard evidence that the plane crashed, as Malaysia has concluded.
The commanding officer of Australia’s HMAS Success, Captain Allison Norris, said she had instituted hourly shift changes to make sure nothing is missed in the vast and remote stretch of ocean notorious for rapidly changing weather conditions.
“Their supervisors remind them of the task and what they’re there for and keep them focused,” she told the Sydney Morning Herald.
“Morale remains good, despite the cold conditions.”   
The United States said it was sending a second P-8 Poseidon aircraft to Perth, but would not be dispatching a warship.
“We believe — and just as importantly, the Malaysian government believes — that the most important asset that we have that we can help them with are these long-range maritime patrol aircraft,” said Rear Admiral John Kirby.
Thailand’s Geo-Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency said it had satellite images taken on Monday of 300 objects, ranging in size from two  to 15 metres.
It said they were scattered over an area about 2,700 kilometres (1,680 miles) southwest of Perth, but could not confirm they were plane debris.
The agency said the items were spotted about 200 kilometres away from an area where French satellite images earlier showed objects.
Japan’s Cabinet Satellite Intelligence Centre’s study showed the objects it  sighted on Wednesday were up to eight metres in length and four metres wide  with Jiji Press citing an official at the office as saying they were “highly  likely” to be from the plane.
MH370 is presumed to have “ended” after mysteriously diverting from its Kuala Lumpur-Beijing path and apparently flying for hours in the opposite direction.
Malaysia believes the plane was deliberately redirected by someone on board, but nothing else is known.
The search suspension on Thursday caused mounting concern as the clock ticks on the signal emitted by the plane’s “black box” of flight data.
The data is considered vital to unravelling the flight’s mystery but the signal, aimed at guiding searchers to the device on the seabed, will expire in under two weeks.--AFP


MH370 Lost in Indian Ocean: Technology hindered, helped search for Flight 370

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NEW YORK: The disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has presented two tales of modern technology.

The limitations of tracking and communications devices allowed the plane to vanish from sight for nearly three weeks. But satellites’ advanced capabilities have provided hope that the mystery won’t go unsolved. 
In this day and age of constant connection, the public has been surprised to learn that radar and satellites aren’t actually all-seeing, cellphone locations aren’t always traceable and key data about the plane is only recorded, not transmitted in real time to the ground.
And onboard tracking systems can be disabled manually — one theory holds that someone in the cockpit intentionally diverted the plane and disguised their actions.   
“Technology can track a flight, but assuming malice was involved, it wouldn’t change the outcome of this disaster. Only better human intelligence and screening can do that,” said Richard Aboulafia, an aviation consultant with the Teal Group. 
Still, the mystery of Flight 370 would have been even more perplexing if it wasn’t for some of these technologies. The little information we have today about where the plane might have crashed came from satellites.  
“If it weren’t for the technologies, nobody would have had a clue where to look,” said Scott Hamilton, managing director of aviation consultancy Leeham Co. 
Here is a look at how old and new technologies have aided or hindered the search effort. 
  • TRANSPONDERS 
These cockpit devices send signals to radar stations on the ground with details about the plane’s flight number, heading, speed and altitude. The transponder also can be used to send predetermined messages to air traffic controllers.
For instance, if a plane’s transponder squawks out a code of “7500” it means there has been a hijacking. A squawk of “7600” refers to a radio failure and “7700” means an emergency. 
Flight 370 took off from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia at 12:40 a.m. local time on March 8, heading to Beijing. Then at 1:20 a.m., the transponder stopped transmitting.
The Boeing 777-200ER with 239 passengers and crew aboard kept flying for several hours but no further signals were ever received from the transponder. 
It’s rare for a commercial pilot to intentionally turn off a transponder during flight, but occasionally there is a legitimate reason, such as a malfunction, electrical short or fire. Pilots would want to shut it down rather than risk a fire spreading.   
  • RADAR 
Radar was developed just before the start of World War II. The word radar is actually an acronym: radio (use the R and the A) detection and ranging. 
An antenna on the ground sends out electromagnetic waves. They reflect, or backscatter, from the surface of an aircraft and almost instantly return to the radar station.
Since these radio waves travel at a known, set speed — the speed of light — the radar system is able to calculate how far away a plane is from the antenna.  
But radar’s only able to track planes within 200 to 250 miles, depending on the age of the technology and the weather. Station locations are selected to allow for a slight overlap so planes in high-traffic areas are never out of reach. 
In the case of the Malaysia Airlines jet, military radar picked up a signal at 2:14 a.m. of a plane flying in the opposite direction of Flight 370’s original path. The radar signal was infrequent and there was no transponder data, making it harder to track. 
Normally, when planes leave areas of radar coverage, pilots use high-frequency radios or satellite text communications to update air traffic controllers of their position at routine intervals. 
  • SATELLITE TRACKING 
Some jets use satellites to regularly send maintenance data back to headquarters.
Malaysia Airlines did not opt to subscribe to this service from Boeing.
The jet’s disappearance has many calling for airlines to live stream information from planes’ voice and data recorders.
However, transmitting data by satellite from all 80,000 daily flights worldwide wouldn’t be cheap — it costs US$7 to US$13 a minute for each plane.
And it’s not like airlines are flush with extra cash. On average, they made US$4.13 in profit per passenger last year and US$2.05 in 2012. 
Other satellite transmissions from the plane, however, helped searchers ultimately narrow in on the plane’s final location in a remote part of the Indian Ocean. 
The plane automatically sent a brief signal — a “ping” — every hour to a satellite belonging to Inmarsat, a British company, even after other communication systems shut down. The pings indicated that the jet kept flying for seven hours after its last radar contact. 
Inmarsat was able to calculate two long arcs indicating where the plane might have flown. It refined that analysis by factoring in the jet’s speed relative to the satellite.
The company gauged how the frequency was received and transmitted — the so-called Doppler effect is similar to the way the sound of a passing car changes as it approaches and passes by a fixed point. 
This Burst Frequency Offset method had never been used before. Its validity was confirmed by applying the analysis to six other Boeing 777 flights — whose positions were known— on the same day, flying in various directions.  
That new information led to an announcement Monday night by Malaysian Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak that the plane ended its flight in a remote part of the Indian Ocean. 
  • SATELLITE IMAGES  
Private satellites and those of several governments have now spotted what is believed to be parts of the plane in the Indian Ocean, about 1,550 miles southwest of Perth, Australia.
Those images are helping investigators narrow their search area and might be the best tool in ultimately finding the remains of the plane. 
  • CELLPHONES 
Many people initially asked why cellphone GPS data couldn’t be used to help find the missing plane.
Several relatives of passengers said they were getting phones to ring, even if they remained unanswered.
Smartphones can help pinpoint a person’s location but only if they are near a cellular tower allowing the phone to transmit data.
If a plane is 7 miles up in the air or flying over the ocean, the phone won’t be able to connect with towers on land. As for why the phones kept ringing, that’s sometimes what happens when a network can’t locate a phone. 
  • SEARCH PLANES 
Several planes are searching for the plane in an area that’ an eight-hour round-trip flight from their Australian base.
That leaves only enough fuel a two-hour search of the target area. Among the planes searching are a Lockheed P-3 Orion and a C-130 Hercules. 
The flight crews use a radar system and infrared, long-range and high resolution cameras — plus their own eyesight — to search the ocean. They also films everything so they can review what they’ve seen after they return to base.  
But the searches have been hampered by dangerously high winds and churning seas. 
  • BUOYS 
A C-130 Hercules military transport plane has been dropping 3-foot long buoys with GPS into the water to help get a better understand of the ocean currents in the search area.
While not perfect, the idea is to get clues about where crash debris might float over time to further refine the search. 
  • BLACK BOXES 
There are two so-called black boxes, which are actually orange. One records conversations and noises in the cockpit. The other saves key flight data such as speed and altitude. 
The boxes are designed to withstand strong impacts and large fires. They also come with a device that pings to help searchers find it underwater, though the deeper the box, the more difficult it is to hear those pings.
The U.S. Navy has sent a Towed Pinger Locator to the Indian Ocean. It can hear the black box pinger down to a depth of about 20,000 feet. 
The black box battery is required to last at least 30 days, but information can be retrieved for years. It took 23 months to find the black boxes from an Air France crash in 2009. All of the data was recovered. 
In the case of Flight 370, there’s a problem. The cockpit voice recorders only save the last two hours of conversations. The plane flew for nearly seven hours after the transponder stopped emitting a signal.
So, any cockpit conversation or noises from when the plane initially went off course were likely recorded over.  --AP



Malaysia Chronicle items .....



Secrets held , intimidation attempts....



Friday, 28 March 2014 18:40

There's evidence on MH370 that can't be revealed, M'sia tells already angry Chinese relatives

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There's evidence on MH370 that can't be revealed, M'sia tells already angry Chinese relatives
Under fire by angry relatives at a briefing yesterday (Mar 26), a Malaysian team told relatives of Chinese passengers on board the missing flight MH370 that there was evidence about the MAS plane that cannot be made public.
According to The Straits Times China Bureau, they revealed at the briefing held at Metropark Lido Hotel in Beijing that the sealed evidence included air traffic control radio transcript, radar data and airport security recordings.
It was a briefing focused on the UK satellite analysis which led Malaysia to conclude that flight MH370, which lost contact mysteriously on Mar 8 en-route to Beijing, had ended in south Indian Ocean.
The Chinese relatives were told that a five-member high-level team from Malaysia plans to brief them once every five days. The team include MAS pilot Lim Jit Koon and senior civil aviation official Ahmad Nizar Zolfakar.
The Malaysian team were bombarded with a barrage of questions by the Chinese relatives, who criticised that they were "reading every word out of the powerpoint slides".
As the satellite analysis was from UK firm Inmarsat, the team responded:
"We can answer [your questions] but we might not be correct as we're not the investigators."
The Chinese also criticised Malaysia for being slow in disseminating information, not revealing everything about the incident, as well as only providing 50 caregivers for the relatives of the passengers, of which two-thirds are Chinese.
An airline official explained that they had problems finding volunteers to help out.
"We demand you retract announcement that MH370 ended in south Indian Ocean and continue search-and-rescue operations,'' one relative said at the briefing.
Some family representatives targeted Malaysian envoy Iskandar Sarudin, asking him: "You expect us to accept a report you cannot defend?"
Sarudin declined to comment.
Upset by the response from the Malaysia team, a relative said: "You have once again left us speechless!"
-singaporeseen.stomp.com.sg

and....





Friday, 28 March 2014 16:27

HERE COMES THE INTIMIDATION: Report inciteful comments on MH370 - Malaysia's top cop

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HERE COMES THE INTIMIDATION: Report inciteful comments on MH370 - Malaysia's top cop
MUKAH - Inspector General of Police Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar today urged the public to report offensive and incendiary remarks over Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 to the authorities.
The nation’s top police officer claimed that politicians were using the national tragedy to further their interests to the detriment of the family members of the 239 people aboard the missing plane.
“This is the thing about these people, the politicise everything and take advantage of the situation for their personal agenda.
“They are not helping the search efforts and making it more emotionally straining for the affected family members,” said Khalid here today.
Khalid did not, however, specifically name individuals involved in such activity, nor did he specify examples.
He also did not say what laws those posting such comments would have breached.
Asked about the investigation into the plane’s disappearance, Khalid reiterated that police were still focusing on the four possibilities of sabotage, hijacking, personal problems and psychological issues with those on board.
Khalid assured family members of the passengers and crews that any new findings and updates would be made known to them promptly.
MH370 disappeared on March 8 during its flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing and remains missing despite a multinational search effort. -Malaymail





Flight 370 debris or more sea debris / trash , sea foam and waves ? 




Friday, 28 March 2014 19:16

OBJECTS SPOTTED: Plane sees possible MH370 debris

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 OBJECTS SPOTTED: Plane sees possible MH370 debris
AMSA says the RNZAF Orion spotted objects in the MH370 search area but the identity of the objects is yet to be established.
The RNZAF Orion is due to land at Pearce RAAF base soon, but the sightings need to be confirmed by ship which is not expected to happen until tomorrow.
Also tonight, Japanese authorities have announced that they have satellite images which show a number of floating objects about 2500 kilometres southwest of Perth.
This comes as Malaysian authorities today received satellite imagery from Thailand.
“Early this morning we received separate satellite imagery from the Thai authorities which also showed potential objects,” Acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said.
“These new satellite images join those released by Australia, China, France, and Malaysia, all of which are with RCC Australia.
“The range of potential objects, and the difficulty in re-identifying them shows just how complex this investigation is. We remain grateful to all our partners for continuing to assist in the search operations.”
Authorities said the location of the search area is the reason why some countries have withdrawn from the search effort.
This comes as relatives of the Chinese passengers aboard missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have demanded China mount its own inquiry into the disappearance, a letter shows.
The document, sent to Beijing’s special envoy in Kuala Lumpur, denounced Malaysia’s handling of the search and asked the Chinese government to set up its own “investigation office’’.
News of the letter comes as a committee set up by relatives of the 153 Chinese passengers has begun discussions with lawyers about a potential lawsuit against Malaysia Airlines, a move that the family members have hotly debated among themselves.
“We question Malaysia’s motivations in misleading and delaying so as to miss the best moment to find MH370,’’ the relatives wrote in the letter to special envoy Zhang Yesui on Thursday, blasting Kuala Lumpur’s behaviour as “irresponsible’’ and “inhumane’’.
“We earnestly request that China establish an investigation office into MH370,’’ the letter states, also urging “an effective communication system between the relatives and the government’’.
Asked about the request, foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei told reporters today: “We have repeatedly pointed out that under the current circumstances what is pressing now is the search.’’
There were 153 Chinese citizens on board the flight and the letter came days after frustrated family members staged a protest in front of the Malaysian embassy in Beijing.
Malaysia Airlines CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya said it was not yet clear whether Malaysia and China would continue a co-share arrangement on the flight route between Kuala Lumpur and Beijing.
“We obviously will be in discussion with China Southern on this because that flight is a co-share,” he said.
“So far Boeing has not provided any form of funding but they are in full cooperation with the investigation team, and ourselves as well, trying to find out what happened to MH370.”
When asked about compensation for the relatives of victims, Mr Yahya said that what families wanted most was evidence of the aircraft.
“We are obviously talking to the various legal parties and the families on this,” he said.
“So far what we have been requested is actually, certainly by the family members, is to identify the evidence affirmatively which means they want to see evidence in terms of the aircraft.
“They are still looking for the evidence of the aircraft. That’s why the search has actually intensified to make sure we can locate the aircraft.”
PLANE FLEW FASTER, CRASHED SOONER THAN THOUGHT
New analysis of radar data from Malaysia Airlines’ flight MH370’s initial hour in the air indicates the plane flew faster and crashed sooner than previously thought.
The search off Perth has today shifted dramatically, more than 1000km northeast and closer to the Australian coast, after Malaysian authorities shared “a new credible lead”.
Australia is no longer convinced the satellite images that supposedly depicted debris fields in the southern Indian Ocean are bits of floating plane fuselage or flotsam associated with the wreck of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.
A senior source close to the search said it had cooled on its belief that a debris field of 122 objects was related to plane wreckage. The source also said that reports a Thai satellite had located a separate debris field of some 300 objects were not being treated as credible by theAustralian Maritime Safety Authority or the Australian Transport Safety Bureau.
SOUTHERN INDIAN OCEAN: WHY FLIGHT MH370 IS SO HARD TO FIND
The Australian authorities had not received any formal information from Thailand and have now dismissed the reports, which they first heard via the media.
It is not clear what the white specks seen on satellite — some reported to be as large as 20m — did in fact show.
But Australia is of the view that it has thoroughly combed the area where 122 objects were supposedly seen, and despite unconfirmed aerial sightings of three objects in the area, ships had found nothing.
On day 21 of the search John Young, manager of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority’s emergency response division, said this afternoon that four planes were in the area, and that six ships were on the way to the new zone, which was “now our best place to go”.
“We have moved on from (previous) search areas,’’ said Mr Young.
”The search we’ve had to date is what we had at the time. New information will emerge.
“I don’t count the original work a waste of time.’’
MEMORIAL IN PERTH PLANNED FOR MH370 VICTIMS
Latest development ... The new search zone for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.
Latest development ... The new search zone for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. Source: Supplied
Martin Dolan, chief commissioner of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB), Australia’s investigation agency, said this is the best estimate of the area where the aircraft is likely to have crashed into the ocean.
“We have taken into account drift information as well as the likely entry point of the aircraft into the water,” he said.
The key pieces of information being analysed relate to early positional information from the aircraft and its later polling of the satellite through its aircraft systems, he said.
“The new information is based on continuing analysis of radar data about the aircraft’s movement between the South China Sea and the Straits of Malacca before contact was lost.
“This continuing analysis indicated the plane was travelling faster than previously estimated, resulting in increased fuel usage and reducing the possible distance the aircraft travelled south into the Indian Ocean.
“Radar and satellite polling data has been combined with information about the likely performance of the aircraft, speed and fuel consumption in particular, to arrive at the best assessment of the area at which the aircraft is likely to have entered the water.
“The information provided by the international investigation team is the most credible lead that we currently have in the search for aircraft wreckage. -News.com.au





Blame game ? 




Friday, 28 March 2014 19:15

HOLD YOUR TONGUE ZAHID: Don't poke fire with China to win political pts at M'sia's expense

Written by J. D. Lovrenciear
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HOLD YOUR TONGUE ZAHID: Don't poke fire with China to win political pts at M'sia's expense
The Home Minister of Malaysia, Ahmad Zahid Hamidi is ‘blaming Chinese newspapers’ for “stoking the anger” of the families of those on the ill fated Boeing MH370.
That is a very serious allegation if not an a blatant accusation!
It is reported that the Minister said so in the august house of the Parliament, the Dewan Rakyat. And that he went on to further clarify that he was referring to the media in China.
“They have played up sentiment until they provoked the anger of the relatives of victims of MH370 especially those in China.” said Malaysia’s Home Minister.
It makes the media in China look very, very bad!
And if that was not enough, Zahid reiterated that the government of Malaysia should not be blamed for the loss of MH370 because it was an “accident”.
Woe-be- thine!
Do accidents DROP from heaven?
The first lesson for Malaysia's leaders is “accidents” do not drop from heaven, unless you have conclusive evidence that a thunderbolt struck the plane in mid-air. And even then, an accident takes place because of the fusion of two factors, namely an unsafe condition and an unsafe act. But let us keep this lesson for another time.
More importantly, how on earth is Malaysia expected to salvage its battered reputation in the eyes of the world if you have senior leaders taking such provocative and tauntingly hostile positions right in the middle of an unresolved mystery that has 239 lives at stake involving citizens of over a dozen nations?
Has the Malaysian Minister not learnt in school, college or within the corridors of power and politics that one should never slay the camel you need to depend on when out in the desert?
Has he never been told that one should not go to war with the media especially when you are stuck in an extremely vulnerable position, not knowing truth from lies, facts from assumptions?
China media not like the Malaysian-Chinese media here - under Umno's thumb!
And in the midst of the most unwanted news of a state-of-art aircraft tragedy that has global implications of epic proportions, we have to witness yet another Malaysia-stance hammering the China media.
Yes, Malaysians may have put up with the guns galore that keep pounding their local media that are not patriotically aligned to the world’s longest ruling political party – given the oppressive Publishing and Printing Act in the country and for not getting of permits to operate a free and responsible press.
But stop treating media from other nations too in like manner. Woe-be-thine to any leader who thinks he or she can muzzle free press – the icon of human freedom, dignity and democracy. And neither appear as trying to kill the sheep to get the wool needed in an attempt to pull wool over the eyes of the peering global community.
Travel agencies have started to cold-shoulder 'things Malaysian'
Let Mr. Zahid be told too. Mongolia media may not have created a global outcry over Malaysia’s brutal and world unprecedented slaying of their one citizen, Altantuya Shaaribuu in the backyard of Malaysia.
But certainly China’s media will not lie back and swallow bait, hook and line for as long as there are no globally acceptable answers given with honorable and timely accountability on the missing aircraft that involves 152 of its citizens.
For that matter not even the media in the USA, or any of the nations whose citizens are unaccounted for till this day since the reported missing aircraft, would take an indiffrent and univolved position.
China media is not going to patronize the UMNO-BN government at the expense of the outcries that are already sweeping across that vast nation. Already the on-line media and traditional press is abuzz with campaigns from celebrities to business communities to boycott Malaysian products.
Even travel agencies in China have started cancelling MAS promotions back in their homeland.
Get honest Honorable Home Minister of Malaysia. Stop pushing Malaysia over the cliff of extreme vulnerability?
Why should China media listen to you!
Can Malaysia afford a media war with China? Can Malaysia afford a “Buy Last Malaysia” campaign in China – like what Malaysia’s former premier Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamed did when he went ballistic with the “Buy British Last” campaign to muster his political agenda back home.
You must be kidding. Certainly you cannot be naïve by virtue of the fact that you are the Home Minister. The China media is not going to stop here. It will by any measure, do extensive investigative journalism till the ultimate truth is out in the open.
Certainly you cannot ask the China media to be ‘less hostile’. Surely you cannot ask the China media to be kind and sympathetic to you or your pack of leaders who are spearheading this tragedy.
What you need to recognize is they are not Malaysian media who can be threatened, cajoled and stifled with threats, circulation seizures, hefty law suits and withdrawal of permits.
Hold your tongue
Hence rather then accuse them of “stoking anger”, wisdom should have dictated that you held your tongue. And you would have done better for your nation and all the affected nations and their citizens if had chosen to court the world media -including China's Press with forthright information, clarifications and appeals on a timely, consistent and proactive manner.
Please Honorable Home Minister of Malaysia, do not further jeopardize Malaysia’s sovereignty, reputation and desperate need for correction.
Learn from Malaysia's early Sultanate whose wisdom prevailed when the Chinese war junks anchored on the Straits of Malacca.
They knew despite not having the internet advantage and social media how small was Malaya and knew too well too how to protect the reputation and dignity and honor of both nations. - MAILBAG



and....

Friday, 28 March 2014 07:34

GOVT CONSPIRACY TO BLAME CAPT ZAHARIE? It was the PILOT who did it - M'sian cop tells USA Today

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GOVT CONSPIRACY TO BLAME CAPT ZAHARIE? It was the PILOT who did it - M'sian cop tells USA Today
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - The pilot of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet is believed to be solely responsible for the flight being taken hundreds of miles off course and there is no evidence of a mechanical failure or hijacking by a passenger, according to an law enforcement official involved in the investigation.
A high-ranking officer attached to a special investigative branch of the Malaysia police force in Kuala Lumpur told USA TODAY on Wednesday that investigators are pressing relatives of the pilot, Capt. Zaharie Ahmad Shah, for information on his behavior leading up to the March 8 flight.
The official could not speak on the record because he is not authorized to talk publicly on the investigation.
The Boeing 777 was bound for Beijing when it vanished from civilian radar. Malaysia says satellite data indicate the plane veered west about an hour after takeoff and then flew south deep into the southern Indian Ocean.
MORE: Satellite spots 122 possible plane objects
The lack of places to land there and the amount of fuel needed to get there indicate the flight must have ended there and that there is no realistic hope the 239 people on board survived, according to Defense Minister Hishammuddin Hussein.
A French satellite scanning the Indian Ocean for remnants of a missing jetliner found a possible plane debris field containing 122 objects, he said, calling it "the most credible lead that we have."
The search resumed Wednesday after fierce winds and high waves forced crews to take a break Tuesday. A total of 12 planes and five ships from the United States, China, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand were participating in the search.
The investigator, who has been on the case since the beginning, told USA TODAY police believe the pilot "deliberately" redirected the plane. He said of those on board the flight, only the captain possessed the experience and expertise to fly the plane.
The official said investigators have found no connection between Zaharie, 53, and any militant groups, and the 27-year-old co-pilot on the flight did not have the experience to manage such a diversion, they believe.
Zaharie was a firm supporter of the opposition party to the current ruling regime and his flight left the day that the party's leader, Anwar Ibrahim, was sentenced to five years in prison on sex crimes his supporters say are fraudulent. Zaharie was in the courtroom when the verdict was announced.
STORY: Pilot one of many government foes
The official said there was nothing amiss in Zaharie's finances to suggest he did something drastic for money. And he refuted reports in British media that Zaharie received a phone call moments before the flight was to depart from a woman who used a false name to obtain a cellphone SIM card to make the call.
He said as far as investigators knew, he did not receive a phone call to his cellphone at that time.


Friday, 28 March 2014 17:10

Ships, planes speed to new MH370 'crash' site amid growing doubt missing flight will ever be found

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Ships, planes speed to new MH370 'crash' site amid growing doubt missing flight will ever be found
NEW analysis of radar data from Malaysia Airlines’ flight MH370’s initial hour in the air indicates the plane flew faster and crashed sooner than previously thought.
The search off Perth has today shifted dramatically, more than 1000km northeast and closer to the Australian coast, after Malaysian authorities shared “a new credible lead”.
Australia is no longer convinced the satellite images that supposedly depicted debris fields in the southern Indian Ocean are bits of floating plane fuselage or flotsam associated with the wreck of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.
A senior source close to the search said it had cooled on its belief that a debris field of 122 objects was related to plane wreckage. The source also said that reports a Thai satellite had located a separate debris field of some 300 objects were not being treated as credible by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority or the Australian Transport Safety Bureau.
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SOUTHERN INDIAN OCEAN: WHY FLIGHT MH370 IS SO HARD TO FIND
The Australian authorities had not received any formal information from Thailand and have now dismissed the reports, which they first heard via the media.
It is not clear what the white specks seen on satellite — some reported to be as large as 20m — did in fact show.
But Australia is of the view that it has thoroughly combed the area where 122 objects were supposedly seen, and despite unconfirmed aerial sightings of three objects in the area, ships had found nothing.
On day 21 of the search John Young, manager of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority’s emergency response division, said this afternoon that four planes were in the area, and that six ships were on the way to the new zone, which was “now our best place to go”.
“We have moved on from (previous) search areas,’’ said Mr Young.
”The search we’ve had to date is what we had at the time. New information will emerge.
“I don’t count the original work a waste of time.’’
MEMORIAL IN PERTH PLANNED FOR MH370 VICTIMS
Latest development ... The new search zone for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.
Latest development ... The new search zone for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. Source: Supplied
Martin Dolan, chief commissioner of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB), Australia’s investigation agency, said this is the best estimate of the area where the aircraft is likely to have crashed into the ocean.
“We have taken into account drift information as well as the likely entry point of the aircraft into the water,” he said.
The key pieces of information being analysed relate to early positional information from the aircraft and its later polling of the satellite through its aircraft systems, he said.
“The new information is based on continuing analysis of radar data about the aircraft’s movement between the South China Sea and the Straits of Malacca before contact was lost.
“This continuing analysis indicated the plane was travelling faster than previously estimated, resulting in increased fuel usage and reducing the possible distance the aircraft travelled south into the Indian Ocean.
“Radar and satellite polling data has been combined with information about the likely performance of the aircraft, speed and fuel consumption in particular, to arrive at the best assessment of the area at which the aircraft is likely to have entered the water.
“The information provided by the international investigation team is the most credible lead that we currently have in the search for aircraft wreckage.”
FLIGHT MH370: SOUNDS OF THE DEEP MAY HINDER SEARCH
Mr Dolan said the information needed to be continually adjusted for the length of time elapsed since the aircraft went missing and the likelihood of any drift of any wreckage floating on the ocean surface.
“Finally we stress that under the international convention Malaysia has investigative responsibility for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. At this stage ATSB’s main task is to assist in the search for the aircraft.”
FLIGHT MH370: MEET THE AUSTRALIAN WHO SHOULD BE DEAD
Organisers arrange black ribbons during a ceremony in memory of passengers on board the m
Organisers arrange black ribbons during a ceremony in memory of passengers on board the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in Kuala Lumpur. Source: AP
The new search area is approximately 319,000 square kilometres and around 1,850 kilometres west of Perth. AMSA resumed today’s search with a total of 10 aircraft and six ships.
My Young said the search area remains large: about 319,000 square kilometres with sea depths in the new area range from 2000 metres to 4000 metres.
Planes and ships had spent a week searching about 2500 kilometres southwest of Perth, whereas now they are searching about 1850 kilometres west of the city.
Mr Young said that as the new search zone is closer to Perth, where planes are being flown from, spotters have longer time on the scene than before. Until now, they only had one to two hours before having to return to RAAF air base Pearce.
“We’re now doing much better than that,’’ Mr Young said.
He added the “best information” about where to search related to the aircraft’s flight path, rather than satellite imagery of possible debris.
“Anything we can have about movement of aircraft creates the greatest degree of confidence,” he said.
“We’ve also had satellite imagery. Satellite imagery has been followed up but actually had not produced any sightings for us but that might change in the future.
“We also use sophisticated oceanographic modelling to determine where objects will move. In terms of keeping the search area confined, knowing what happens to the water is very important.”
A host of images from Japanese, Thai and French satellites had given searchers hope — now apparently false — that a debris field from the plane was in the earlier search area. Collectively they detected hundreds of objects ranging from 1 metre to about 20 metres in length.
Mike Coffin, the executive director of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at Australia’s University of Tasmania, said the frequency of the apparent false alarms raised questions about the quality of the satellite data, though it’s also possible that the satellites detected real objects that were simply unrelated to the plane. Mr Coffin has sailed in that part of the ocean.
”There is all kinds of debris in the ocean,’’ he said. “When you are out there, you see stuff all the time.’’
Mr Young said a “significant amount of random dispersion of objects” would have occurred in the 21 days since the plane crashed, steadily increasing the size of the search area.
Weather conditions in the new search area will also be more favourable, he said.
As the search continues, Malaysia Airlines is struggling to control the backlash from China and took a swipe at the media over its irresponsible reporting.
“Malaysia Airlines wishes to thank media publications that have been responsible in their reporting of MH370,” it said in a statement.
“We shall continue to cooperate in providing such information as we can but independent investigations are now underway and we do operate under strict constraints in this regard.
“In the meantime our top priority remains to provide any and all assistance to the families of the passengers and crew.”
Remembered ... Motor racing driver Lewis Hamilton prepares to drive with a sticker on his
Remembered ... Motor racing driver Lewis Hamilton prepares to drive with a sticker on his helmet in memory of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 during practice for the Malaysia F1 Grand Prix. Source: Getty Images
Prime Minister Tony Abbott said he has been briefed about the new radar data analysis of the flight path.
“This is a credible new lead and will be thoroughly investigated today,” Mr Abbott said.
“This is an extraordinarily difficult search, and an agonising wait for family and friends of the passengers and crew,” he added.
“As I have said from the start, we owe it to them to follow every credible lead and to keep the public informed of significant new developments. That is what we are doing.”
The Prime Minister said leading experts from around the world are working to solve this “baffling mystery”.
“It has been a truly remarkable international effort.”
“We will continue to work closely with the Malaysian and Chinese governments and with all our international partners to locate MH370 and find answers to what happened to it.”
New search directions ... Flight Lt. Jayson Nichols looks at a map as he flies aboard a R
New search directions ... Flight Lt. Jayson Nichols looks at a map as he flies aboard a RAAF AP-3C Orion. Picture: Michael Martina Source: AP
It was announced yesterday that Thai and Japanese satellites had spotted other floating objects ranging from two to 16 metres in length, about 2700 kilometres southwest of Perth.
“But we cannot — dare not — confirm they are debris from the plane,” said Anond Snidvongs, director of Thailand’s space technology development agency.
Japan’s Cabinet Satellite Intelligence Centre said their analysis showed 10 objects in the search area, suggesting a debris field.
The objects were up to eight metres in length and four metres wide.
Jiji Press cited an official at the office as saying they were “highly likely’’ to be from the plane.

Family ... a woman breaks into tears as she places a paper crane as a symbol for hope and healing during a ceremony in memory of passengers on board the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight. Picture: AP Source: AP
SEARCH ZONE: Understanding the Indian Ocean
But relatives of the 239 people aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 expressed their frustration at yet more satellite discoveries that have not been backed up by the recovery of any actual debris.
“Until something is picked up and analysed to make sure it’s from MH370 we can’t believe it, but without anything found it’s just clues,’’ Steve Wang, whose 57-year-old mother was aboard the flight, said in Beijing.
“Without that, it’s useless.”
Wang Zhen, whose parents were aboard the missing plane, said in a telephone interview in Beijing that he was becoming exasperated.
“There is nothing I can do but to wait, and wait,’’ he said. “I’m also furious, but what is the use of getting furious?’’
The families’ anger has not diminished this week; the Straits Times reported that Malaysian authorities infuriated passengers’ loved ones by telling them at a briefing this week that there was “sealed evidence that cannot be made public” in relation to the missing flight.
“The sealed evidence included air traffic control radio transcript, radar data and airport security recordings,” the paper reported.
The remarks by Malaysian authorities — made at the Metropark Lido Hotel in Beijing — have not been reported by other major newspapers, despite being widely shared on social media.
Mission control ... a navigation screen aboard an AP-3C Orion aircraft shows their curren
Mission control ... a navigation screen aboard an AP-3C Orion aircraft shows their current location represented by a white circle during their mission to the (former) search area. Source: AFP
THE LATEST SATELLITE IMAGES
The new pictures were taken by Thailand’s only earth observation satellite on Monday but took several days to process and were relayed to Malaysian authorities on Wednesday.
The discovery was reported less than 24 hours after the Malaysian government revealed 122 objects had been seen about 2557 kilometres from Perth, ranging in length from one metre to 23 metres.
It’s unknown whether the satellites detected the same objects; currents in the ocean can run a meter per second and wind also could move material.
Thailand faced criticism after announcing more than a week after the jet’s disappearance on March 8 that its radar had picked up an “unknown aircraft” minutes after flight MH370 last transmitted its location.
The Thai air force said it did not report the findings earlier as the plane was not considered a threat.
The Malaysia Airlines plane is presumed to have crashed in the Indian Ocean with 239 people on board after mysteriously diverting from its Kuala Lumpur-Beijing path and apparently flying for hours in the opposite direction.
New clues ‘useless’ without answers
Blue skies but fading hopes ... RAAF Flight Lieutenant Russell Adams looks out from the cockpit. Picture: Paul KaneSource: AFP
CHALLENGES OF THE SEARCH
Thunderstorms and gale-force winds grounded the international air search for wreckage on Thursday.
Meanwhile, the specialist visual spotters who have spent countless hours searching the vast Indian Ocean for signs of the missing plane are battling fatigue and tricks of the mind.
For all the fancy technology on board the planes and vessels scouring the swirling waters, the best tool searchers have are their own eyes — but they can play tricks or blink at the wrong moment.
Fighting fatigue...A RAAF crew member looks out of his observation window while searching
Fighting fatigue ... a RAAF crew member looks out of his observation window while searching for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 over the Indian Ocean. Picture: AP Source: AP
RELATED: How MH370 saga will impact on Malaysia
“Thinking about that is what keeps you going over what can be really, really long and quite dull missions at times,’’ says one searcher. “Is it going to be behind this next wave?’’
“You might be looking for a single canoe in the vastness of the Pacific and we do find them.
“So there is always hope.’’
Remembered...A woman takes a photo of a screen showing candles lit for relatives of passe
Remembered ... a woman takes a photo of a screen showing candles lit for relatives of passengers on the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in the Metro Park Lido Hotel in Beijing. Picture: AFP Source: AFP

An interesting theory as to how an accident may have occurred -- and that the pilot was a hero not a scoundrel .....




http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2591402/MH370-flight-deck-fire-similar-one-broke-Boeing-model-2011-downed-missing-jet-claims-London-law-firm.html





Is this proof that flight MH370 was downed by a 'blow torch' fire in its cockpit? British lawyers claim missing jet suffered same fate as another Boeing 777 three years ago


  • Malaysian authorities believe foul play aboard could have downed the jet

  • But London-based law firm believe a fault led the plane to catch fire

  • EgyptAir Boeing 777-200 with 291 passengers on board caught fire in 2011

  • Cairo fire due to problem with the cockpit hose used to provide oxygen 

A fire in the cockpit of a Boeing 777 in Egypt in 2011 could explain the disappearance of the Malaysia airlines jet, it has been claimed.
Stewarts Law, which has litigated in a series of recent air disasters, believes that a flight-deck fire and oxygen failure may have caused the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.
Since the Beijing-bound airliner disappeared on 8 March with 239 people on board speculation has been rife about whether foul play by either the pilots or someone aboard led the aircraft to disappear.
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A fire which led to a Boeing 777 being written off in Egypt in 2011 could explain the disappearance of the Malaysia airlines jet, it has been claimed

A fire which led to a Boeing 777 being written off in Egypt in 2011 could explain the disappearance of the Malaysia airlines jet, it has been claimed
But James Healy-Pratt, a member of the firm who is also a pilot believes the plane crashed after a fire broke out aboard.
'We believe in the simpler explanation that there was probably a form of electrical fire leading to a rapid decompression and that then resulted in the turn-back and the aircraft disappearing somewhere in the Indian Ocean,' he told The Times.

The British law firm, which is advising families of the missing passengers, is comparing the current situation with a fire that broke out on the flight deck of an EgyptAir Boeing 777-200 with 291 passengers on board as it prepared to depart for Jeddah from Cairo airport.

A British law firm is comparing the current situation with a fire that broke out on the flight deck of an EgyptAir Boeing 777-200 with 291 passengers on board prepared to depart for Jeddah, pictured

A British law firm is comparing the current situation with a fire that broke out on the flight deck of an EgyptAir Boeing 777-200 with 291 passengers on board prepared to depart for Jeddah, pictured

WHAT CAUSED THE 2011 FIRE ON BOEING IN CAIRO AIRPORT ?

When the captain was preparing the aircraft for departure the oxygen levels were normal.
But 30 minutes later the first officer heard a pop followed by a hissing sound underneath a cockpit window to the right. 
The captain tried to put it out using the fire extinguisher available in the cockpit, but it was too powerful and firefighters worked at extinguishing it for over an hour.  
The crew and passengers escaped without injury, although seven people including passengers, Egyptair staff and fire fighters suffered from mild asphyxia and were transferred to hospitals.
After an investigation Egypt's Aircraft Accident Investigation Central Directorate (EAAICD) released their final report which revealed that the fire originated near the first officer's oxygen mask supply tubing.
Oxygen from the flight crew oxygen system is suspected to have contributed to the fire's intensity and speed. 
The cause of the fire could not be conclusively determined. It is not yet known whether the oxygen system breach occurred first, providing a flammable environment or whether the oxygen system breach occurred as a result of the fire.
Investigators pinpointed a problem with the cockpit hose used to provide oxygen for the crew in the event of decompression. 
Following the 2011 blaze US aircraft owners were instructed to replace the system - it was estimated to cost $2,596 (£1,573) per aircraft. 
It was not known whether Malaysia Airlines had carried out the change.
The crew and passengers escaped without injury, although seven people including passengers, Egyptair staff and fire fighters suffered from mild asphyxia and were transferred to hospitals. 

When the captain was preparing the aircraft for departure the oxygen levels were normal, but 30 minutes later the first officer heard a pop followed by a hissing sound underneath a cockpit window to the right of the first officer. 

The captain tried to put it out using the fire extinguisher available in the cockpit, but it was too powerful and firefighters worked at extinguishing it for over an hour.  

After an investigation Egypt's Aircraft Accident Investigation Central Directorate (EAAICD) released their final report which revealed that the fire originated near the first officer's oxygen mask supply tubing - investigators pinpointed a problem with the cockpit hose used to provide oxygen for the crew in the event of decompression. 

Following the 2011 blaze US aircraft owners were instructed to replace the system. 

It was not known whether Malaysia Airlines had carried out the change.

'In simple terms, this fault can cause a blowtorch type fire that will melt aluminium in a matter of seconds,' said James Healy-Pratt, told The Telegraph. 

'We believe that in due course, the crew will be regarded as heroes rather than villains, and we sincerely hope the Black Boxes will contain the data to back that up, and to prevent further needless loss of life,' Mr Healy-Pratt added. 

The cockpit fire theory has been supported by Chris Goodfellow, a Canadian pilot with 20 years experience, who hailed captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah as a hero, not a hijacker, in his fascinating explanation, which claims to debunks all theories about the fate of the missing jet.

He insists the only reasonable scenario is that a fire broke out aboard the plane and Shah was doing exactly what he needed to do in an emergency - get the plane to the nearest airport as soon as possible.

Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah. 'We believe that in due course, the crew will be regarded as heroes rather than villains,' Mr Healy-Pratt said

Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah. 'We believe that in due course, the crew will be regarded as heroes rather than villains,' Mr Healy-Pratt said
In this case, that was the 13,000 foot strip Palau Langkawi, and that is directly where the aircraft was heading when it was last tracked. 

However, Goodfellow believes the crew were overcome by smoke and the aircraft flew as a 'ghost plane' for hours past the chosen airport.

'We old pilots were always drilled to always know the closest airport of safe harbor while in cruise. Always,' Goodfellow wrote. 'Instinctively when I saw that left turn with a direct heading I knew he was heading for an airport.'

He said he immediately brought up Google Earth and discovered the runway, which was had fewer obstacles blocking the plane's approach than if Shah attempted to return to Kuala Lumpar, which was also further away.

Two sources told Reuters an unidentified aircraft, which investigators believe was Flight MH370, was following a route between navigational waypoints - indicating it was being flown by someone with aviation training - when it was last plotted on military radar off the country's north west coast (file picture)

Gone: The Malaysian Airways jet (not pictured) vanished on March 8 after communication was severed just one hour into a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing

'This pilot did all the right things. He was confronted by some major event aboard that made him make that immediate turn back to the closest safe airport,' he says in the post.

But Shaheer Magdy Abdel Sayyed, the pilot on the Egyptair flight where the fire took place, says the two incidents have significant differences. 

'The problem happened with my aircraft at the ground. If the same problem happened while the plane flying it will not last for too long before it fall,' he said reported The Telegraph. 

'It was very fortunate for me and for the passengers and the crew that it was in the ground but if it happened while the plane flying there will not be any flying, the plane will not fly all that distance and will fall immediately in its location.'

Earlier this month, it was reported that the US Federation Aviation Authority (FAA) ordered airlines to fix a potentially fatal flaw in some Boeing 777 jets six months ago - although the flaw did not affect the particular model of 777 used on the MH370.

The FAA reportedly warned the planes could suffer a drastic loss in cabin pressure or even break apart because of cracks or corrosion in the fuselage.

Malaysian authorities have insisted the plane had been 'fully serviced' and all the maintenance checks 'were in order'.
A spokesman for Boeing declined to comment on a possible parallel between the incidents due 'to international rules surrounding air incident investigations.' 

COULD MH370 HAVE CRASHED DUE TO A NEW FAULT WITH A BOEING?

While the 777 has an excellent safety record, with an accident rate of one quarter the rate of the total jet fleet, theories abound about mechanical or structural failures that could have contributed to the disappearance of flight MH370.
If something did turn out to be wrong with the aircraft it would be the latest in a long list of problems that have beset Boeing planes recently, albeit incidents that mainly occurred on its 787 model and didn't involve any injuries, fatalities or aircraft losses. 
Here are some of them:
January 7, 2013: The battery on an empty Dreamliner caught fire at Boston airport
January 15, 2013: A flight made an emergency landing in Japan after a smoke alarm went off. The string of incidents led to regulators ordering a global grounding of the entire Dreamliner fleet, which lasted for four months
July 12, 2013: Ethiopian Airlines plane catches fire on the runway at Heathrow, forcing the closure of the whole airport
January 14, 2014: Norwegian Airlines Boeing 787 was preparing to take off from Bangkok on a journey to Oslo when a passenger saw that fuel was leaking on to the runway





http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/mar/28/mh370-search-shifts-700-miles-closer-to-australia

( nothing but sea foam and breaking waves   rather than debris from the missing plane ? Might why explain why nothing has been found to date ....) 



The sheer volume of potentially misleading satellite imagery of possible objects in the southern Indian Ocean could be hampering the search, according to a leading oceanographer.
Dr. Simon Boxall from the University of Southampton, also cast doubt on the "objects" claimed to have been spotted in some of the recently released satellite images.
In an email to my colleague Louis Degenhardt, he said: 
The burgeoning number of prospective satellite sightings could now detract from the main search objectives, to locate (any) confirmed surface debris from a Boeing 777. 
Take the Thai image as a good example which supposedly shows several hundred "targets" in a small area. As someone who has analysed optical images of the oceans for many years, all but two to three of these objects are likely to be sea-foam and wave breaking. 
This image was taken at a time of high winds and the pattern is consistent with hundreds I've seen over the years. It is also important to emphasise that the ocean is sadly full of debris from many sources which moves rapidly in this region of fast flowing and complex currents. 
The fact that no confirmed sightings have been made from aircraft or ships in the original area lends support to a shift in focus.

Satellite images provided by Thailand's Geo Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency show floating
Satellite images provided by Thailand's Geo Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency show floating "objects" in the Indian Ocean. Photograph: Xinhua/Landov/Barcroft Media

On the new shift in search area, Boxall commented:
The only known is the approximate last known location of MH370 based on the Inmarsat data analysis, which is correct beyond all reasonable doubt. I don't know the source and logistic of the new data that the aircraft was travelling faster (and hence using more fuel) than previously thought but the limit of the flight path of MH370 will be determined by fuel capacity. 
On this basis the new search does make sense, though the limited information about the sea floor in the region does mean that the topography of the area is more mountainous, making subsequent sonar searches more difficult. 
However it is viewed, the challenges in ever finding the wreck and black box of MH370 grow with each day that passes.




An oceanographer has told the Guardian that Malaysia is "incorrect" to suggest that wreckage could have drifted hundreds of miles south-west of the revised assumed crash site.
Malaysia's transport minister Hishammuddin Hussein said satellite images of objects could be consistent with the new search zone. 
But this was challenged by Charitha Pattiaratchi, Winthrop professor of coastal oceanography at the University of Western Australia. 
In an email to my colleague Louis Degenhardt,he said: 
I just heard that they had announced in Malaysia - in a press briefing that there is a connection between the site in the Southern Ocean and the new search area.

This is hearsay - they had claimed that the debris identified by the Chinese, French and Thai satellites may have originated from the new search area and is consistent with the shift to the new region.
If they said this - it is incorrect !
There is absolutely no connection, in terms of the debris between the two locations which are 1000 km apart.

In the southern location the debris was moving eastward and were trapped in eddies.
Professor Pattiaratchi provided chart showing debris tracks from the new search area.
He explained:
The colours represent those originating from the same colour point along the aircraft track. The square is the the current proposed search area.
The red square at towards the bottom shows the southern search area.

Ocean drift patterns
Ocean drift patterns Photograph: University of Western Australia
drift
Ocean drift patterns Photograph: /University of Western Australia









Here's a summary of the main developments: